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What Lower Oil Prices Really Mean
By: CareerCast.com
One of the subtlest, most effective moves in sports is the head-fake. It's a thing of beauty when done well. In the energy commodity business, it can be disastrous to anyone who falls for it. Right now, everyone is focused on low crude oil prices, and the subsequent layoffs and rig shutdowns that follow. I say it's a head-fake, because too many companies are buying into the narrative and scurrying for cover, while the smart money slips past them to victory. In the past, a downward move of 50% would have spelled disaster for the oil and gas industry. This ... more
Jobs in Oil Not Exactly Striking Gold
By: CareerCast.com
The world runs on oil and gas – that’s a given. The onshore and offshore industry has weathered the recession, and advancements in drilling technologies will attract more job hunters to the industry over the next decade. If you’re one of them, be prepared to compete for energy jobs at nearly every level. While no one exactly relishes the process of the job application and interview, you can take steps to help enhance your chances for success. Here are seven tips – plus one reminder – that can make a difference in your job hunt Crafting your resume Play fair. ... more
Oil Extraction Growth Means More Jobs
By: CareerCast.com
The US recorded the largest single-year increase in oil production in 2012, according to the BP Statistical Review of World Energy. The review, released June 12, was the company’s 62nd annual report. With the increase in production, the industry has also seen extraordinary growth in recent years. The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reports that nearly 192,000 Americans were employed in oil and gas extraction careers at the end of 2012. That was a jump of nearly 11,000 from 2011, 30,000 since 2010 and 35,000 since 2009 (see graph at left). The upward trend has continued through the initial months ... more
Laser Technology Could Play A Part In Future Energy Efficiency
By: CareerCast.com
In the movies, lasers make things explode. Occasionally, they make things explode in real life, too. Even more occasionally, they do this in a way that’s beneficial, by making the explosions that we rely on every day even better. Lasers: making your daily explosions 27 percent more explodey. Let’s do it. Unless your life is way more exciting than mine, most of your daily explosions probably take place inside the engine of your car. In a conventional internal combustion engine, a mixture of fuel and air explodes to push down a piston, converting chemical energy into mechanical energy. The explosion ... more
I.T. Jobs in Oil and Gas Industry May Offer Best of Both Worlds
By: CareerCast.com
IT jobs just aren’t for software companies anymore. If you are an IT professional, you can find careers in many types of industries, including IT jobs in the oil and gas industry. If you are considering moving from a software company to the energy industry, you should prepare yourself for a potential shift in work culture. Whether it is valid or not, software companies have gained a reputation for being casual in dress code, hours, and language. That isn’t to say that the work is lacking or its people are not professional, but acknowledging and adjusting to a different work ... more
How to Get Your Foot in the Door With An Entry-Level Oil Industry Job
By: CareerCast.com
By Brad Dunleavy In February 2013, I landed an entry-level floorhand position on an oil well service rig in Alberta, Canada. For months, I had searched job sites for entry-level positions, but the only job postings I ever came across were for senior positions or jobs that required a specialized education, such as engineer. I finally succeeded in landing my entry-level oil rig job after spending $3,000 on a course I found through Kijiji while searching for jobs. The course was described in such a way that made it appear to be an oil rig training program. Yet when I ... more
Investment In Solar Energy
By: CareerCast.com
Kearsarge Energy, a renewable energy project developer and financier, announced the operations of the 4.9-MW Kearsarge Southwick solar project, representing the largest operating SREC II solar PV project in Massachusetts. “This project is a great example of how harnessing solar power can protect the environment, save on energy costs, and create jobs,” said Department of Energy Resources Commissioner Judith Judson. “Projects like this one in Southwick play a key role in reaching the Baker-Polito Administration’s solar goal of 1600 megawatts by 2020.” Elsewhere, in Mississippi, Mississippi Power, is expanding its renewable generation portfolio with an agreement to team on another ... more
Jobs in North Dakota Oil Are Hot But the Dakotas Are Not
By: CareerCast.com
For anyone hit by our ailing economy, the prospect of earning a six-figure salary in a North Dakota boomtown might seem irresistible. However, jobs in oil and gas often come at a price, and though one’s first inclination is to follow the money, there are other factors to take into account, especially for those with a family. Here are eight questions you’ll want to consider before you start searching for jobs in oil and gas: 1. How will my spouse react to the idea of moving? If your honey will have to give up a nice job or leave family ... more
Professional Help Needed In The Oil Industry
By: CareerCast.com
Companies operating in the Marcellus and Utica shales say it's been a challenge to fill openings in engineering, geology, environmental health and other professional fields. The Marcellus Shale Coalition, a gas drilling-industry trade group, released a workforce survey Wednesday of more than 100 of its members. The survey indicates that about half of the industry's new hires in 2012 were equipment operators or work in operations and maintenance. Companies say professional and management jobs are the most difficult to fill. The companies that took part in the survey say they plan to add 4,000 jobs in 2013. CONTINUE READING AT ... more
Coal Gaining Ground On Gas In Energy Market
By: CareerCast.com
Natural gas faces growing competition from coal and renewable energy sources at a time when its potential demand growth is slowing down, an International Energy Agency official said. “The last large contracts for [LNG] were signed in 2014 just before oil prices collapsed. We believe it is still competitive, but there are risks,” said Laszlo Varro, who heads IEA’s gas, coal and power markets division. “LNG is the only option besides pipelines to transport large amounts of gas from country to country, but it’s very expensive,” Varro said during a June 25 presentation at the Center for Strategic and International ... more